Feb Half term- last day in the Cotswolds

There were two villages on our list of places we hadn’t visited yet – Stow on the Wold and Bourton on the water. We got up bright and early – well 9 am, skipped breakfast and headed towards Stow, where we decided to enjoy breakfast and had a wander. It’s another lovely town- the stone they use in the buildings here is so pretty! Stow on Wold is full of tea rooms, antiques shops and posh hotels, and during our hour or so here I spotted at least 3 ladies in full length fur coats and posh hats. Needless to say, I felt rather underdressed in my mud laden walking trousers and campers hair do, but never mind! 🙂

After a wander round, we decided that we’d have a late breakfast in Bluebell and hit the road 5 miles or so to head to Bourton on the water. I had a walk lined up, and we were keen to explore the village later in the afternoon, as the guidebooks seemed to suggest this was the quieter and more atmospheric time to visit.

Bourton is very motorhome friendly, the main car park has a seperate zone specially for motorhomes, and there are signs everywhere saying you can park and sleep overnight. We were pleased as we wanted to stay there overnight but both campsite were shut! On closer investigation the charges for the car park were astronomical!! And very confusing. If you parked in the special motorhome bays, you were charged a pound an hour or so more than the other bays. It should basically have cost us £13.50 to park from 1200 to 1800 then another £8 for overnight 1800-0900. Whilst we both agreed we would pay these charges this time as it meant we could park and relax, we did think it was slightly greedy- there were no facilities at all there and £21.50 is an awful lot to pay to park!! Anyway good on you Cotswolds council for taking the step, but we feel it just needs a bit of realistic refining price wise.

We enjoyed our walk and loved Bourton on Water- it’s dubbed as the Venice of the Cotswolds and you can see why. It’s so pretty!!

After we had thoroughly explored the area we were trying to find a cosy pub with a roaring fire, similar to those we had enjoyed earlier in the week. Unfortunately Bourton seems to have more tea rooms than pubs, and the one that we found, the Kingsbridge, although very friendly, felt more like drinking in a wetherspoons than a rural retreat, so after a quick drink we headed back to Bluebell. By this time it was coming up to 5pm and conversation started to turn to plans for the evening. Our options were to pay the extra £8 to stay overnight and chill in the van or to hit the road back to Norfolk, as we were due to leave tomorrow morning early anyway. We decided given the weather was very cold, we would prefer to get going and then enjoy a lay in Sunday morning in Norfolk rather than sit in a car park for £8 and have to get up at 7 to drive home. So we had a quick bite to eat, packed up and hit the road. 3 1/2 hours later we arrived back home with lovely memories of our time in the Cotswolds. We loved every second and will definitely return soon.

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Night 3- feb half term, Chipping Campden

We had a lovely lie in this morning- we didn’t wake up until 9:30! All this fresh air and walking is giving us both a healthy glow that’s for sure!

We awoke to a frozen water tank again today- but had left taps open all night and the tank off so hopefully we averted any damage! We had arranged to meet Krystle in the car park at Chipping Campden at 11 and so after a quick breakfast we hit the road. It was a short drive to get there and soon found Krystle and Flashy. We decided to have a quick cuppa before we begin, but due to our frozen tank, we found a lovely little dog friendly coffee shop on the high street which had the most amazing selection of cakes. Somehow we managed to resist the cakes for now and settled with a quick coffee/tea. We were soon on our way- we had opted for a 5 mile walk up to the summit of Dover hill viewpoint. During the walk we tried Jazz off lead for the first time! I was a bit scared, but I didn’t need to be. He loved every second and never strayed further than eyesight from us, always coming back to check where we were!

The countryside here is beautiful. Rolling hills with chocolate box villages dotted around. Everyone we’ve met so far have been so friendly, and the pubs and tea shops have been dog friendly, most offering free boneos for our four legged friends.

After another stunning walk, we headed back to the village to find a pub for lunch. We stumbled across The Red Lion, a gorgeous Olde world time capsule with a fab log fire that we enjoyed relaxing in front of! Keith was particularly enjoying the Olde Trip ale that was on tap! After some delicious baguettes and homemade chips we couldn’t resist but to head back to the coffee shop at The Noel Arms we had been to this morning to sample some of their sweet treats!! So we wandered down and settled ourselves in front of another log fire, with the dogs flat out at our feet and enjoyed a cream tea. It was terribly refined, and utterly irresistible. Krystle and I mused over how far we had come from our lambrini drinking Uni days!!

Keith and I decided we would like go try and find a site closer to a Chipping Campden rather than trek back to Winchcombe where we had intended to stay. A quick look in the camping and caravanning club book and a couple of phone calls later and we had found a site 2 miles away for a mere ten pounds. We bid our farewells to lovely Krystle and Flash and hit the highway to find our site. We are pitched up on the very friendly Greystones Farm. Unfortunately we had a slight “stuck in the mud” incident but friendly farmer Rob came to our rescue in his traccccor and we were soon settled with the heating on full and a beer in our hand. All this fresh air is making us everso tired so I imagine an early night is in order. We don’t actually have any plans tomorrow- so we will see where we end up!!

Until next time

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Night 2 – Broadway, Cotswolds

I’m writing this from the same campsite that we stayed at last night, Pinnock Wood Farm just outside of Winchcombe. We had such a lovely evening here last night that we decided to stay again tonight- at £14 a night for a pitch with electric, it’s worth every penny in this weather! It’s glorious during the day, but bitterly cold. It’s so cold that when we woke this morning we had no water as we had frozen!!

Luckily for us, we thawed by lunchtime and with no signs of damage. But our original plan of wildcamping in Broadway tonight seemed less appealing with the forcast saying it could reach -5 tonight, we opted for the electric fan heater option!

We had a great day in Broadway today- it was difficult not to keep breaking out in song and dance seeing as we were in Broadway! A totally different experience to being on Broadway, USA I’m sure, but still, we enjoyed our day there. It was a nice treat for Keith when we arrived- the first thing we saw was a Thomas Kinkade gallery- Keith is a massive Kinkade fan, so he had a browse whilst I waited outside with Jazz. When it was my turn to nip in, the observant gallery manager insisted we bought Jazz in- she was a big dog lover and was happy to welcome four legged friends into her gallery.

Krystle, Patrick and Flash arrived shortly after and we set about a walk up to see Broadway tower. It felt quite a slog on the way up, but the views were fabulous and once we got to the top we were rewarded with views for miles. The tower was an interesting building, and we all agreed we could happily live there!

We had a brisk walk back down to the village- the prospect of a late pub lunch and a pint certainly helped! We found a gorgeous little pub called The Swan, and were welcomed in like long lost friends. The menu was mouth watering! Keith and I both had BBQ pork ciabatta with home made chips and it really hit the spot!!

So here we are, back at the campsite and chilled to the max. Krystle is coming back to walk with us tomorrow- the joy of having friends who are also teachers and sharing the same holidays as us. Tomorrow we are heading towards Chipping Campden 🙂

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If you are planning on visiting the area check out visit Broadway

Twixmas 2011 – Daisy’s finale voyage…

One of the drawbacks with being a musician is that November and December turn into absolutely CRAZY times! It was this, and the fact that Daisy was having a new water pump fitted, that following our October jolly, we weren’t able to get out again until in between Xmas and New Year. We didn’t know it at the time, but this was to become our finale voyage in dear old Daisy, as unbeknownst to us (until a particularly large amount of rain one afternoon) we discovered the thing that most motorhomers fear…. the DREADED LEAK! 😥 We were staying on a nice little site just outside of Cromer, Norfolk , with my Dad and Jen, and we started noticing the tell tale signs. We tried to justify it, saying it was condensation at first, but as time went on, and the walls got softer and softer, we soon realised we were dealing with the real macoy – a proper Talbot reknowned leak. Still, we managed to grin and bear it, and had a lovely time. The site was lovely – http://www.moorlandpark.co.uk/ and we had a great walk all the walk to Sheringham for fish and chips and a pint, then shared a taxi back. 🙂

Daisy crosses the Channel – Feb Half Term 2011 – Northern France

France. I love it. I love everything about it. The food, the drink, the people, the countryside, the cities, the fashions, the language – everything. Ever since my first trip to France aged 13, I’ve been hooked.

I couldn’t hold off any longer, February 2011 was the time for us to hit the ferry to France. I was so excited! We had a few things we were wanting to do once over there:

1) Visit Hornfleur and eat Moules and Frites over looking the harbour

2) Visit the Bayeux Tapestry

3) Visit the Thiepval Monument in the Somme (my Great Uncle died during the Somme and is listed at Thiepval)

Our itinery was fairly loose, and we were going to “wild camp” as often as we could, something in which the French were reknowned for, and well equipped for. I’d been telling Keith ever since we got Daisy how we should get our selves across the water and do some motorhoming, French styleee.

The French have this awesome awesome system called “Aires”. An aire is usually an open space/car park area specially set aside for motorhomes, or camping cars as they are know in French. Often they have services such as a water tap, maybe electric, waste dump etc, and quite often they are free or a minimal charge. The aim is to attract campers to the village/town, they stay for free, and then spend money in the area on a meal, in a bar, at the market- wherever and whatever. What a great idea. UK needs to wake up to this, sooner rather than later in my opinion.

Anyway, I subscribed to this fab website http://www.motorhomingfrance.co.uk/ which list all the aires in France, and exactly where they are and what they provide. I had even marked them all on our road atlas for france. Talk about being prepared. What I failed to realise was that a) February isn’t a very popular time to motorhome in France, therefore b) hardly any of the aires that we visited had any fresh water or electric available. More on that in a sec..

First stop in France was the glorious St Valery Sur Somme. What a gem. We arrived in time to park up in what we would learn to be the best aire of that trip. We managed to park up, plug in to get eleccy, fill with water and wander down into town for a Croque Moseur and a litre of red all before 2pm. All was fabulous in the world, we were happy as larry. We had a lovely afternoon exploring the town and headed back to Daisy later on. We had a perfect night on the aire and couldn’t believe we had waited so long to come and do this! Next morning, Keith went for his shower in Daisy and discovered we had no hot water. This later developed into no gas. Bummer. One thing we had been told- make sure you have enough gas, as the french system is different and incompatable with English vans. Crap. We had no gas on the first day of our holiday, and the gas powers the hot water system, the cooker, and the heating, and we are in the middle of winter in Northern France. Our lack of organisation on the gas front was made up for by our over organisation on the things we had stocked under out seats. A quick delve and we felt reassured- we found our electric heater, our old camping stove that we thought we’d cart with us “just in case” and athough we couldn’t do much about the hot water system, we decided just to grin and bear it and book on a site a couple of times for a good hot shower.

One thing I hadn’t quite realised is that in France, in February, pretty much every single campsite is closed. I mean it, we called loads and could not find a single one within the whole of Northern France! So no hot shower for us then this week. Oh well we kept saying, we are camping!

Back to the camping and the tour. Hornfleur. Magical. Especially when it was sunny, which it was when we visited. The aire there is great. 5 minutes walk to the centre of town. You just can’t complain at that. I think we paid 3 euros. Try finding a b&b for that much.

Bayeux Tapesty – one of those moments when you think, yes, I can cross that off the bucket list. AMAZING

Normandy Beaches- especially Arromanches- what a great place. So erie, we sat having a beer in a bar and it felt like we were there in the 1940s. It was so atmospheric, the landing crafts still visible in the water, you could easily imagine the soliders there. Fab

Omaha Beach and the American Cemetry. I have to be honest, this wouldn’t have been my first choice of places to visit, but my Keefy wanted to, and my goodness am I glad I did. It was very interesting. And so unbelievably emotional. We stood on Omaha beach and I just couldn’t help myself, I was so overcome with emotion I found myself crying.

Rouen. Now- this is where we had a slightly unfortunate/worrying incident in Daisy. I was driving. If you have never driven to/in Rouen- here’s a thought. Dont! Seriously the worst place I have EVER driven. EVER. The ring road was like the M25 mixed with Spagetti Junction x 100. To cut a long story short, I had an argument with Sarah (the sat nav), disagreed with the directions, swerved off the duel carriageway to get to road I was SURE we needed to go down. I was so busy “being right” I missed the height barrier signs, and then of course the height barrier, and bammed right into it at 40mph. Even this didn’t stop me, I carried on and then realised- what is the height barrier protecting. The underpass of course. So I had to reverse up a duel carriage way, the wrong way, back through the height barrier that we were too tall for (all with traffic coming our way of course, pipping etc). Screeched onto the main ring road again and hoped and prayed that nothing had fallen off the top of our roof. As sods law would have it, we couldn’t actually pull over for about 10 minutes to check everything. The worst 10 minutes of my life. I wasn’t sure even if the roof was still there. THANKFULLY it was and all was ok. Or so we thought. Later that night we discovered a leak, and unfortuntely that was the beginning of the end! We needed a new roof vent for a start and over the next year we would discover more leaks. But at this point we were blissfully unaware so after several stiff drinks, we could see the almost funny side and were ready to carry on with enjoying our week in France.

Next day we headed to the Somme. We had an incident where we had to stop on the toll road and use the side barrier for Keith to get onto the roof to fix the roof vent. (oops) Luckily we had the right equipement with us, including the high vis jackets, which I was enjoying wearing since we’d bought them specially for the trip (it’s illegal not to have them when you drive in Europe)

The Somme was a great place to visit too. Thiepval was another moving experience as was the circuit of Remembrance that we took part in having found a leaflet with the driving instructions on.

We ate so much lovely French food, and drank some fantastic wines. We survived without hot water and heating for a week and we didn’t have electric either. We showered in cold water using bottled mineral waters as the taps had frozen up and we spent a fortune! But, we had a great week, despite the fact I nearly killed Daisy. Would we do it again? It’s taken me a whole year and a new van, but now we have Bluebell, yes I really think we would. Although I don’t think Keith would let me take Bluebell back to Rouen….

Until Next time!

Twixmas 2010/11 – Derbyshire and North Yorkshire

After numourous weekend jollies ere there and everywhere, we set about planning our Twixmas Break (Twixmas is the period in between Xmas and New Year, doncha know). Keith, being a “blaaaady saaaatherner” hadn’t explored much of Northern England before, so we decided to head to Derbyshire/North Yorks.

We set off on our travels a couple of days after Christmas, stopping again for an Ali BaBa’s with Krystle in Cov (well it’d be rude not to, and she needed a hand moving some furniture into her new house)

Our itinery was to go to Bakewell, home of the glorious tarts, then hook up with Dad and Jenny and their friends Simon, Emma and Selina for a night on a CL somewhere close by. We would then move onto a

different site near Goredale for NYE (we wanted a site where we could definitely have a TV signal to watch Jools Holland’s Hootenany! and this one promised on it’s website a tv aerial on each hook up) We then traveled onto a farm site somewhere near Malham (I love that place) and visited Malham and Asgarth, before finishing up near Wensleydale.

We had a lovely break, but would be lying if we said we didn’t encounter any problems at all…..

Firstly- pre setting off, the problem with taking a motorhome to Northern England in the middle of winter is that its a bit of a lottery with the weather. We prefer to stay on the small sites (Caravan and Camping Club certified sites only take 5 vans, generally only offer minimal services such as a water tap and a loo dump, sometimes some toilets or a shower, but definately no club houses and all for under a tenner usually..) As such, you tend to find that the sites tend to not want to commit to booking which is fair enough, as you really run the risk of being snowed in at the time of year. Therefore, we found ourselves a little up in the air about whether we would even get up there or not, and whether we would get on a site or not.

Secondly- on our first night we had rather a major leak in the bathroom! We ended up looking all our water from our tank and being stuck in a field not really sure what was happening. My mentality allows me to just think “Oh well, we will sort it in the morning..”. Keith’s mentality doesn’t allow him that luxury. Cue us packing up Daisy, to move it to the farmhouse courtyard (we were in a seperate field) in the pitch black, freezing cold, Keith having to borrow a tool from the farmer to take off all of the paneling in the bathroom to look at the pipes, do something to the pipes, reattach the paneling, re fill with water (the only tap in the field had frozen so we were instructed to use the tap in the cow shed), move back to the camping field, get all our stuff out again. To be fair to Keith and his “I must do this right now” attidude, we were both able to have a nice hot shower that night. Unfortunately during his morning shower the same thing happened again. So off we trotted to Matlock Bath to find his own tools, (number one

rule in a motorhome- don’t go anywhere without tools, you will need them!)

Matlock Bath- I love this place, I used to go regularly with Mum, Dad, Grandad, anyone who would take me really. I can’t tell you how often I have told Keith, we must go to Matlock Bath, you’d love it! So the compromise went like this.. Keith would buy his tools in Matlock Bath and whilst we were there we could explore. Luck didn’t want to be our side that day, clearly. We arrived in the most dense fog I’ve ever seen. You couldn’t see a bean. We went to Sainsburys to get the tools in the hope the fog would lift. When we came out we were planning on moving the van elsewhere so we could explore. Went to start the van. Nothing, nada, zilch, not a bean. We called the AA and were told they would be with us in an hour. We waited an hour. Nothing. Waited another hour. Nothing. Rang AA. Oh sorry Miss P we can’t get anyone to you within 8 HOURS! 8 HOURS!!!!! Bearing in mind we were very close to the M1 and even if they sent someone from London they could be here quicker than that. No Miss P, sorry, just the way it is. Ok. So we had a beer in Daisy (one advantage to a motorhome), Keith fixed his leak once and for all. And then an AA van turned up. He started looking at Daisy and couldn’t work it out. Next thing, another AA van turns up. The two mechanics were rather surprised to see each other there. The second guy straight away asks if we have a fuel pump switch on Daisy. We have no idea, naturally! He spends a minute inside the cab, and next thing Daisy fires up like a dream. Turns out there is this little switch by the leg of the driver. This controls the fuel going into the pump. It’d been switched off accidently as I got out of the drivers seat! The thing about motorhoming is you tend to learn something new every day!

By now, it was pitch black, pea soup foggy, we were tired, hungry and fed up. Back to the campsite, a nice hot shower and a glass of vino, and the world was ok again. But Keith still hasn’t seen Matlock Bath. We must go back!

After this incident, thankfully the rest of the trip went by without hitch. We had a lovely time, we ate well, we drank well, we slept well. All was great until we turned up at our campsite for NYE and found it to be a rather odd place. Too many statics for our liking, and then the guy parked us up in the car park. There was no TV signal, even though it was promised, so we couldn’t watch Jools. We did get electric eventually though, so we spent NYE watching back to back Sex in the City (I am so lucky, K not only tolerates the girly chick flicks, he actually enjoys them!)

Highlights:

DoveDale Stepping Stones

Malham Tarn, Mallam Cove. Awesome. Old Peculiar, Log fire- couldn’t have spent a few hours in the pub in Malham!

Asgarth Falls. Famous for the scene in Robin Hood where Kevin Costner has that sword fight in the water trying to cross to Nottingham- despite the dodgy accent

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